Cleaning Costs are Lower

Less Risk of Fire Damage

Fire Facts

Insurance Savings

References

 

Cleaning and Renovation Costs Are Lower

Smoking can cause extensive damage to guest rooms. Smoke leaves sticky particles, residue, and stains on walls, curtains, cabinets, blinds, furniture, and fixtures. Smoke odors and residue can remain in carpets, curtains, walls, and wallpaper for a very long time. In fact, secondhand smoke residue can stay in fabrics for months, even after they have been washed.1 Dropped cigarettes and ashes can leave burn damage on tiles, curtains, counter tops, and bathtubs. A manager of a Minnesota hotel that allows smoking in some rooms stated that every single smoking room on her property has burn damage. She also stated that they must frequently replace burned linens.2

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Less Risk of Fire Damage

Smoking is the leading cause of fire related deaths.3 These fires can also result in millions of dollars in damaged property and health care costs. Smoke-free policies reduce the risk of cigarette-related fires, damages, and deaths by eliminating lighted smoking materials from the interior of the building.

Cigarette-caused fires often result when a smoker—who may also be impaired by sleep, drugs, or alcohol, drops or improperly disposes of a lit cigarette. A dropped cigarette can lie in furniture or bed linens and smolder for up to 30-45 minutes, eventually causing a fire or large amounts of smoke.4

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Fire Facts:

  • Approximately 25% of victims who die in smoking-related fires in the United States are not the smoker whose cigarette caused the fire.5
  • From 2005-2007, the average dollar loss per hotel/ motel fire was $16,190.6

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Insurance Savings

A Minnesota hotel manger stated that going smoke-free can result in a decrease in insurance premiums—especially for those older hotels that do not have sprinkler systems. According to that manager, being smoke-free also makes it easier to get liability insurance.2

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References

  1. Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights, 2009. http://www.no-smoke.org/learnmore.php?id=188
  2. Key informant interviews conducted by the Smoke-Free Lodging program, 2010.
  3. Ahrens, M. “Home structure fires.” Quincy (MA) National Fire Protection Association, 2009.
  4. Hillel, Alpert R. “Regulating Cigarettes for Fire Safety.” Produced by the Tobacco Control Legal Consortium. 2007 www.tclconline.org/resourcesTCLC.html
  5. Minnesota Fire Marshal. “Fire Fatalities.” 2006.
    U.S Fire Administration. “Hotel and Motel Fires.” Topical Fire Report Series. Vol. 10, Issue 4. January 2010.

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